Academic Technology @ Palomar College

Why I should care about mixed security modes in my Blackboard course

Why I should care about mixed security modes in my Blackboard course

Normally I try to keep the tech-speak down to a minimum in my posts, but this topic, sadly, requires a good bit. Here’s the situation: You’ve provided a web link within your Blackboard course, perhaps to a page on your own Palomar-hosted WordPress site, perhaps to one of the many videos in Palomar’s streaming video catalog. When some (but likely not all) of your students click the link… nothing. They still have the top red area of Blackboard, and the breadcrumb trail, but everything below that is blank.

What is going on?

Likely you are a victim of security. Not “something has gone wrong, dial up the police” kind of security, nor even the “hackers control my bank account” kind… because technically nothing has gone wrong. And that’s why you have a problem.

At this point, if you aren’t confused I suggest you go back and read the last paragraph again. Then once you’re confused we can continue on. There are two main types of communication protocols over the Internet, and the most common is HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol, for those who are acronym curious). The other protocol you’re likely to encounter is HTTPS, where the “S” stands for “Secure“. Should you ever do any online banking, or purchase from Amazon.com, you’ll be using HTTPS. Palomar’s Blackboard system is also accessed using HTTPS, as we do try to keep things as secure as we reasonably can. However, if you are already on a site using HTTPS (like Blackboard) and you link to a page using HTTP in the same browser window (like you might have done in your course), modern web browsers are likely to stop that from happening.

Now if you recall what I’ve had to say about web browsers in the past you already know that the browsers all behave differently, and that everybody ends up using different ones during their online experience. So I’m not going to bother giving specific examples of how the browsers stop this activity… instead I’ll just tell you the easy workaround your students can do immediately, and how you can fix your links to avoid the problem in the future.

When students click a link in your course, and get the blank instead, what they ought to try is to go back and right-click (or control-click for the mono-button OS X users out there) on the link, then choose an option to open the link in a new tab or window. The new tab or window will open, and chances are it will load up the content normally. Why? Because it’s no longer a case of loading unsecured content within a secured tab; now it’s a secured tab and an unsecured tab, which does not represent any security risk.

Now how can you make your web links within Blackboard avoid this problem? If you edit an existing web link, or go to create a new web link (from the Build Content menu), section 4 of the page has an option for “Open in New Window”. For new link additions this should default to Yes; leave it at yes and you’re good to go. For old links if may be set to No; change it, then hit Submit, and you’re good to go.

Easy, no? But knowing that simple workaround can get your students back to learning far more quickly than having to contact support, and knowing to make your links open in a new window will make your course run that much more smoothly.

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