2012-13 Theme: The Right To Think?!

Our theme for 2012-13 is “The Right To Think?! Science, Politics and Public Perception.”  Our four theatre productions investigate different aspects of the current American discourse on the relationship between truth and ideology.   In each play, knowledge  provided by science creates personal and social crisis over questions of ethics, morality , politics, economics and the public good. These American landscapes include the issues of industrial waste and pollution, media manipulation in the interest of  economics, the uninformed electorate, abortion and poverty, human communication in the age of technology, and academic freedom and the teaching of evolution.

In connection to the productions we are offering a series of Coffee Talks with distinguished panelists and public dialogue over the topics raised by the plays.

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How Do We Begin A Dialogue about Racial Justice?

Posted by on August 29, 2016 in Connecting Classrooms 16-17, Dialogue Blog 2016-17 | 10 comments

The Campus Engagement Through The Arts/Coffee Talks project is dedicating this school year to cultivating multiple dialogues on racial justice in the United States.  The Department of Justice Community Relations Services has created a useful Dialogue Guide for conducting dialogues on race.  They make and important distinction between debate and dialogue.

“Unlike debate, dialogue emphasizes listening to deepen understanding. Dialogue invites discovery. It develops common values and allows participants to express their own interests. It expects that participants will grow in understanding and may decide to act together with common goals. In dialogue, participants can question and reevaluate their assumptions. Through this process, people are learning to work together to improve race relations.”

Here at the college, there is a strong belief in the Socratic method of posing questions to deepen our understanding.  I propose that we collectively brainstorm a list of questions that might be useful for beginning the dialogue.  In the spirit of brainstorming, let’s offer questions without self-censorship or judgement of others.  Please use the “Add Your Thoughts” box below to contribute as many questions as you like and to respond to others’ questions.

Characteristics of Community Dialogues on Race

Posted by on August 25, 2016 in Dialogue Blog 2016-17 | 1 comment

from The Department of Justice Community Relations Service

 What do we mean by dialogue?

A dialogue is a forum that draws participants from as many parts of the community as possible to exchange information face-to-face, share personal stories and experiences, honestly express perspectives, clarify viewpoints, and develop solutions to community concerns.

Unlike debate, dialogue emphasizes listening to deepen understanding. Dialogue invites discovery. It develops common values and allows participants to express their own interests. It expects that participants will grow in understanding and may decide to act together with common goals. In dialogue, participants can question and reevaluate their assumptions. Through this process, people are learning to work together to improve race relations.

What makes for successful interracial dialogue?

The nature of the dialogue process can motivate people to work towards change. Effective dialogues do the following:

  •  Move towards solutions rather than continue to express or analyze the problem. An emphasis on personal responsibility moves the discussion away from finger-pointing or naming enemies and towards constructive common action.
  •  Reach beyond the usual boundaries. When fully developed, dialogues can involve the entire community, offering opportunities for new, unexpected partnerships. New partnerships can develop when participants listen carefully and respectfully to each other. A search for solutions focuses on the common good as participants are encouraged to broaden their horizons and build relationships outside their comfort zones.
  • Unite divided communities through a respectful, informed sharing of local racial history and its consequences for different people in today’s society. The experience of “walking through history” together can lead to healing.
  •  Aim for a change of heart, not just a change of mind. Dialogues go beyond sharing and understanding to transforming participants. While the process begins with the individual, it eventually involves groups and institutions. Ultimately, dialogues can affect how policies are made.

Click Here for the full Community Dialogue Guide