SYLLABUS:  Spring 2004

MUS 105, MUSIC THEORY I

Madelyn Byrne

(760) 744-1150, ext. 2809      Office:  D3L                E-mail: mbyrne@palomar.edu

 

 

Scope and nature of course:

 

1.              Analysis and written work in the melodic, rhythmic and harmonic structure of music.

a.     Review of music rudiments, using class handouts.  (First 5 to 6 weeks.)

b.     Study of structure and harmonic usage of triads, using Ottman text, CD and workbook.

2.              Required concert attendance and discussion.

a.     Attendance will be tracked via a student journal with entries for at least 12 concerts during the semester.

                                                     i.     Journal format will be discussed during the second week of class.  The Journal is an important aspect of the student’s work.

                                                      ii.     Students are encouraged (not required) to free their schedules to attend the department’s Concert Hour, Thursdays 12:30 pm-1:30pm.

                                                        iii.     Participation in discussions about performances is important to the student’s development.

3.              Basic keyboard skills reflecting the melodic and harmonic studies.

See “Keyboard Assignments” Handout.

4.              Rudimental use of computer for music notation.

 

Specific course objectives:

Upon completion of course student will have:

  1. developed speed and accuracy in the symbology and terminology of music rudiments;
  2. developed analytical techniques and terminology in approaching music of diatonic harmony;
  3. synthesized basic musical patterns by learning the rules an principles of part-writing;
  4. begun to develop the skill of keyboard harmony;
  5. discerned basic characteristics which distinguish the music of different historical periods and cultures.

required reading:

for initial review section:  Photocopied “Course Packet: Fundamentals Review for Music 105”.

for remainder of first and second semester:

Ottman, Robert.  Elementary Harmony 5th edition, Prentice Hall, 1998. Buy from Palomar Bookstore, Off-Campus Books, or online.

 

 

Text and workbook are required.

Note:  The text is not required until the fundamentals review is finished.  However, it is desirable to use its first three chapters as a reference during this study.  Also note that bookstore will return to the publisher all books that have not been bought by late September!

 

tests and grading:

Eighty-five percent (85%) of the grade is based on scores of 5 to 7 exams throughout the semester and successful completion of journal (equal to one exam).  The rest is based on performance in keyboard and writing assignments, and on active, verbal and communicative participation in class.

approximate calendar of assignments:

Weeks 1-5       Review:  Fundamentals (use handouts, but refer to text, chapters 1, 2 and 3).

Weeks 6-8       Chapter 4.  Develop basis of analysis and part-writing.

Weeks 9-10     Chapter 5.  Continue and add basis keyboard testing.

Weeks 11-12   Chapter 6.

Weeks 13-14   Chapter 7.  Melodic analysis.  (Poor chapter; emphasis on hand-outs.)

Weeks 15-16   Chapter 8.  Transposing Instruments and C-clefs.

what is the difference between fundamentals and the beginning of theory i (called “a fundamentals review”)?

The “Fundamentals review” is intended to do two things:  (1) Reinforce the student’s mastery of fundamentals so that he/she will experience no unforeseen problems resulting from uneven knowledge;  (2) Begin the process of using the fundamentals for higher-order thinking, which is the basis of music theory.

Implied in this description is this “quantum leap” that is taken in the act of studying theory:  Whereas Fundamentals teaches single concepts and tasks. Theory requires the integration of those (and other) concepts/tasks to write or analyze music.  To answer the question, “How is this musical phrase constructed?’  One must integrate knowledge of scale, chord function, meter, rhythm—hypothesizing and testing hypotheses al the while.  Furthermore, it is this higher-ordered thinking that makes theory useful to the performing musician or historian.

Theory I is the demarcation between the courses and musical activities that require only basic and limited knowledge from those that require this kind of integration, without which our students will not succeed in university work or will not realize their interpretive powers as performers.  Those who find theory relatively easy are those who think multi-dimensionally…or learn to do so in studying theory.

 

 

 

music curriculum overview, or

The “Complete” Music Student

 

 

1.              Theory and Skills

“Should I be taking Fundamentals (MUS 103) instead?”

Fundamentals classes:

MWF

9-9:50am

D-4

(Gray, S.)

73473

TTH

9:30-10:50am

D-4

(Byrne, M.)

70633

MWF

12-12:50pm

D-4

(Reusch, S.)

70634

M

6:30-9:20pm

D-3

(Reusch, S.)

73479

 

2.              Performance ensembles

Garage bands are highly desirable, but…

Orchestra

T, 6:30-9:50pm

D-6

(Gilson, R.)

70672

Band

TH, 7-9:50pm

D-6

(Hammond, C.)

70656

Jazz Ensemble

M, 4-6:50pm

D-10

(Glasson, F.)

70657

Rep. Jazz

M, 7-9:50pm

D-10

(Glasson, F.)

70663

Brass Ensemble

MWF, 11-11:50am

D-3

(Hawkins, W.)

70658

Chorale

W, 7-9:50pm

D-6

(Hatcher, W)

70655

Chamber Singers

MWF, 11-11:50am

D-6

(Chase, D.)

70660

Women’s Chorus

MWF, 12-12:50pm

D-5

(Bryan, K)

71126

Guitar Ensembles

T, 11-12:50pm

D-3

(Pile, R.)

70659

 

3.              Keyboard classes…everybody needs the basic skills.  Talk to a piano class instructor to determine your level.


4.              Music Appreciation  (MUS 100):  a survey of everything we’ll refer to (e.g., Bach, Beethoven and the Boys; Renaissance, Baroque, Romantic; Balinese, Indian, Baltic.)  Available classes:

MWF

8-8:50am

D-3

(Hawkins, W.)

70627

TTH

8-10:50am

EC-504*

(Carter, R.)

72982

TTH

9:30-10:50am

D-10

(Gray, S.)

70625

MWF

10-10:50am

D-10

(Gray, S.)

70626

M

1-3:50pm

D-3

(Hawkins, W.)

70628

W

6:30-9:20pm

D-4

(Byrne, M.)

71407

M

6:30-9:20pm

D-4

(Montiel, B.)

72983

*Escondido Campus (meets 8/27-10/17)

5.              Survey of 20th Century Music.  If you have had Music Appreciation, consider taking this course to improve your understanding of the music of the Twentieth Century.  A serious course for serious students.

MWF

12-12:50pm

D-3

(Chase, D.)

70629

6.              Performance Studies  (MUS 222)

a.     You must be taking private lessons to participate.

b.     You cannot expect to excel on your instrument without a fine teacher and consistent practice!

7.              APPLIED MUSIC           (=free lessons!)           (MUS 220)

a.     BY AUDITION         (NEED DATE)

See department assistant for audition application

b.     THE PROGRAM CONSISTS OF:

Enrollment in Applied Music (the lessons themselves)

Enrollment in Performance Studies (see #5 above)

Enrollment in college ensemble (#2 above)

Five (5) hours of practice per week ON CAMPUS.

Jury (i.e., performance as final exam) for Faculty

8.              New (OCCASIONAL) COURSE OFFERINGS:

a.     World music (MUS 171) (M 1-3:50pm, D-4, Byrne, M., 70662)

b.     Musical theatre scenes (MUS 173) (TTH 11-12:20pm, D-6, Gilson, S., 71124)

c.     cuban/brazilian drumming (MUS 137) (F 3-4:50pm, D-6, Lamson, M., 72959)

d.     great musicians through film (MUS 170) (MTWTHF, 8am-12:50pm, D-6, Montiel, B., 70661—meets 1/2/02-1/15/02)

e.     (Serious pianists:) accompanying (Time arranged; 3 hours/week)

See Connie Venti

f.      (Future Music teachers:) kodaly method Music Education Certificate Program

solfege i (MUS 240) (S 9-9:50am, D-4, Rosacker, M., 70686)

folk song research i (MUS 243) (S 9-10:50am, A-11, Geller, D., 72989)

kodaly i (MUS 245) (S 10:00am-12:50pm, D-4, Rosacker, M., 70687)

9.              MIDI/computing music

a.     computer music i (MUS 180) Times differ in Fall and Spring

b.     Electronic Ensemble/Computer Music II(MUS 184) (Time arranged 6 hours/week, D-11, Byrne, M. 73466).

 

 

 

 

 

important non-class activity

 

concert hour

Thursdays, 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Performance Lab (D-10)

A different kind of performance every week.

The basis for discussions with classmates.

 

 

 

 

            practice room pass.  All practice rooms are open to the public during regular working hours (generally 8:00am-4:30pm).  As a music student, however, you can use the rooms after hours by showing a practice pass to a campus guard or music instructor. 

            To get a pass, take a passport-size picture (a snap-shot will do) to Kimberly Loya, Performing Arts Academic Assistant, with proof that you are enrolled in a music class.  Allow a day or two to get the pass.

 

 

C:\Documents and Settings\Jacqueline\My Documents\Chase Theory\MUS 105 Syllabus Fall 2002.doc