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Palomar College Learning For Success

Daniella Kreijen Ashburn M.A.

" AN UNEXAMENED LIVE IS NOT WORTH LIVING" Socrates

History 108 ONLINE (8 WEEK) SAMPLE SYLLABUS

Have a look at the links below to see if online learning is for you:

Online intro from:  California Community Colleges Chancellor’s office

https://apps.3cmediasolutions.org/oei/modules/intro/

For additional information you can go to:

http://apps.3cmediasolutions.org/oei/students.html

 

 History 108

fast-track (8 WEEKS) SUMMER 2019

Daniella (Kreijen) Ashburn

ALL TEACHER STUDENT COMMUNICATION SHALL TAKE PLACE VIA THE INTERNAL CANVAS MESSAGING SYSTEM

SUBJECT AREA AND COURSE NUMBER: History 108 # 50779

Online: Monday 6/17- Saturday 8/9

COURSE TITLE: World History since 1650 UNITS: 3.00

Grade Only

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course examines the comparative history of the world’s civilizations in Europe ,Africa, and Asia, from the dawn the early modern era (1650) until the present. Topics in social, intellectual, economic, and political history are covered. This course is of interest to those planning to pursue a history major in the future as well as anyone seeking a global historical perspective. The objective of this course is neither to be comprehensive nor definitive but to introduce the student to key themes, events and personalities of the period and to develop their critical thinking , writing , reading and note-taking skills. This course is of interest to those planning to pursue a history major in the future as well as anyone seeking a global historical perspective.

PREREQUISITES: NONE

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: EXPECT TO SPEND AT LEAST 4-5 HOURS A WEEK OF WORK

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of the course the student should be reasonably familiar with:

  1. Historical causation from a wide, comparative perspective.

  2. The most significant cultural, political and social structures, forms of cultural expression in art and religion in discrete segments of the world’s civilizations.

  3. Key periods of world history and patterns of change from the early modern period to the present.

  4. The relevance and importance of developments of civilization in the modern era.

  5. The historical frame of reference from the early modern era to the post Cold-War era.

COURSE POLICIES:

  1. STUDENT ↔ INSTRUCTOR COMMUNICATION POLICY

Please use the internal CANVAS COURSE MESSAGE system.

You can find the course message system on the CANVAS pull-down course menu ON THE LEFT (INBOX)

How I will use it:

  • To inform you of any updates, changes and issues pertaining to the course and to respond to your personal messages

      • During the week I usually answer concerns or questions within 24 hours.

      • In the weekend I usually answer concerns or questions within 48 hours

How YOU will use it:

  • To inform me of any issues or questions you have about the content of the course and or the assignments

  • To inform me of any issues concerning late work, non-participation and any other concerns you might have pertaining to the course and your ability to attend to it.

      • You should probably check the course messages several times a week

Be a responsible student! What I don’t know could hurt you; talk to me!

  1. DROP POLICY

  • Students who did not complete the UNIT 0 Introduction Assignments by WEDEDNESDAY 11:59PM. (June19, 2019) will be dropped immediately and without warning.

    Students also will be dropped:

      • If they miss MORE THAN THREE (3) graded assignments by the end of each grading period and no reasonable explanation is given to me via the Course Message system.

OR

      • If they miss MORE THAN TWO (2) weeks worth of UNIT assignments in a row and no reasonable explanation is given to me via the Course Message system.

  • For PALOMAR COMMUNITY College Add and Drop information please go to:

https://www2.palomar.edu/pages/enrollmentservices/calendars/

  1. LATE WORK POLICY

Late work will be accepted until the LAST Wednesday of the semester ( August 07, 2019)

Scores will be reduced according to the following measures:

  • UNIT Assignments: 75% credit within 24 hours, 50% credit within 48 hours, 25% credit after that.

  • Forum Discussions (if applicable): 50% credit within 24 hours, No credit after 24 hours.

  • Since there are no separate exams all of the Lecture Questions assignments and Lecture Assessment Essays fall under the regular Unit Assignment rule as stated above.

All Course Assignments need to be completed before a final grade will be awarded for the course.

Be a responsible student

BOOKLIST:

REQUIRED READINGS:

TEXT: Ways of the World (V2) by Robert Strayer

Publisher: Bedford Saint Martin’s : 3rd Edition or newer (E-book /Loose-leaf PDF OK)

ISBN-10: 1-319-11324-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-319-11324-7

NOVELS : 1. Bitter Bonds: A Colonial Divorce Drama of the 17th Century (Paperback)

by Leonard Blusse

Publisher: M. Wiener Pub.; 1st Markus edition (July 2002)

ISBN: 1558762531

AND Choose One of the following two titles:

2. A Long Way Gone by: Ishmael Beah

Publisher:Farrar, Straus & Giroux; 1st edition (2007).

ISBN:9780374105235

OR

3.A Woman in Berlin by: Anonymous . Publisher:St. Martin’s Press; (2005)

ISBN:9780312426118

Grading and Evaluation:

All graded assignments must be completed to earn a passing grade.

  • Lecture Questions (4 sets) 360 points TOTAL

  • Lecture Assessment Essays (3) 450 points TOTAL

  • Chapter Multiple Choice Questions ( 11 sets/20 QS) 220 points TOTAL

  • Précis (2) 200 points TOTAL

  • Final Project 220 points

  • Getting to Know You intro-activity 20 points

  • What Does History Mean to you? 20 points

  • Syllabus signature 10 points

                    • MAX TOTAL POINTS 1500 points

Assignments:

There will be no independent midterms or final exams but rather continual graded assessments in the form of:

  • LECTURE Questions.

    • These questions pertain to the presented material from the narrated MINI-lectures to be viewed online by the students. They shall consist of short answer questions and identifications of terms used and presented in the narrated MINI-lectures. Students are expected to write a comprehensive insightful paragraph in answer to each of them.

    • Length: 150-250 words.

  • LECTURE Assessments ESSAYS.

    • These assessments essays pertain to the presented materials from the narrated MINI-lectures to be viewed online by the students. They shall consist of a multilayered question that refers to the combined materials of each of the narrated MINI-lectures of that particular section. Students are expected to write a comprehensive essay-style answer addressing all parts of the question. Length: 500-750 words .

  • MULTIPLE CHOICE Questions for each textbook chapter.

    • These multiple choice questions pertain purely to the individual chapters of the textbook. A set of 20 questions shall be available for students to take on CANVAS

  • Two short PRÉCIS

    • Précis are concise, critical summaries of essential points, statements and facts about a particular written piece. In this case about two books the students need to read during this course. Students will be provided with a set of questions to guide them in the writing the précis. A precis is not a book report. No outside sources are allowed in the writing of the précis. Length: 800-1000 words.

  • FINAL PROJECT

    • The final project will consist of a Google Slide or PowerPoint presentation of 20-25 slides on a person, event or historical development chosen by the student that falls within the historical period or this course (1650-Present).

All assignments need to be submitted by 11:59 pm OF THE LAST DAY OF THE GRADING PERIOD to receive full credit.

Earlier submission is recommended.

Grading period/Due dates:

  1. 06/17 – 07/02

  2. 07/03 – 07/21

  3. 07/22 – 08/10

Point distribution 1500 – 1350 (90%) = A

1349 – 1200 (80%) = B

1199 – 975 (65 %) = C

974 – 720 (48%) = D

719 – 0 (FAIL) = F

Academic Integrity and Code of Conduct

Palomar College is wholly committed to the idea and ideals of academic integrity. We embrace and adopt the definition and related principles of academic integrity provided by the Center for Academic Integrity stated in Section 4 Student Rights and Responsibilities of the Palomar College Catalog. For a full explanation of rights and responsibilities please refer to: http://www.palomar.edu/catalog/2010/4sturightsrespon.pdf as well as http://www.palomar.edu/Code_of_Conduct_condensed_version.pdf for the Student’s Code of Conduct.

Disabilities

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection to persons with disabilities. This legislation requires that all students with disabilities are guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring accommodation please contact the Palomar College disability Resource Center (DRC) . For more information also see: http://www.palomar.edu/dsps/

For Add/Drop information please go to:

https://www2.palomar.edu/pages/enrollmentservices/calendars/

Scroll down to: ADD AND DROP DATES AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION

COURSE OUTLINE

  • ALL ASSIGNMENTS are due at the very latest @11:59PM ON THE LAST DAY OF THE GRADING PERIOD

    • EXCEPT the First Day of Class (UNIT 0) Assignment (see below) .

  • IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED STUDENTS FOLLOW THE STRUCTURE BELOW TO KEEP ON TOP OF THE COURSE LOAD

    • EACH UNIT REPRESENTS A WEEK’S WORTH OF WORK

      • DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE LAST MINUTE TO SUBMIT YOUR WORK

*******FIRST DAY OF CLASS JUNE 17*********

PLEASE COMPLETE THE INTRODUCTION ASSIGNMENTS (UNIT 0)

  • Getting to know you BY 6/19

  • What does history mean to you? BY 6/19

  • SYLLABUS SIGNATURE BY 6/19

GRADING PERIOD 1 ( DUE DATE 07/02/19 @ 11:59 PM)

UNIT 1:

READ TB: The Early Modern World, 1450–1750 Toward Modernity . . . or Not?

Sprouts of Modernity? Continuing Older Patterns?

  • Ch 13 POLITICAL TRANSFORMATIONS: EMPIRES AND ENCOUNTERS, 1450–1750

  • Ch 14 ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATIONS: COMMERCE AND CONSEQUENCE, 1450–1750

VIEW: Narrated MINI-Lectures : 1.1-2.2

COMPLETE :

  • MC CH 13 + 14

  • Lecture questions UNIT 1 ID/Short answer

UNIT 2

READ TB:

  • Ch 15 CULTURAL TRANSFORMATIONS: RELIGION AND SCIENCE, 1450–1750

VIEW: Narrated MINI-Lectures: 3.1-3.2

COMPLETE:

  • MC CH 15

  • UNIT 1AND 2 LECTURE Assessment ESSAY

GRADING PERIOD 2 ( DUE DATE 07/21/19 @ 11:59 PM)

UNIT 3

READ TB: The European Moment in World History, 1750–1900. European Centrality and the Problem of Euro-centrism

  • Ch 16 ATLANTIC REVOLUTIONS, GLOBAL ECHOES, 1750–1900

  • Ch 17 REVOLUTIONS OF INDUSTRIALIZATION, 1750–1900

VIEW : Narrated MINI-Lectures 4.1-5.2

COMPLETE:

  • Bitter Bonds Book assignment

  • MC CH 16 + 17

  • Lecture questions UNIT 3 ID/Short Answer

UNIT 4

READ TB:

  • ch 18 COLONIAL ENCOUNTERS IN ASIA, AFRICA, AND OCEANIA, 1750–1950

  • ch 19 EMPIRES IN COLLISION: EUROPE, THE MIDDLE EAST, AND EAST ASIA, 1800–1900

VIEW : Narrated MINI-Lectures: 6.1-7.3

COMPLETE :

  • MC CH 18 + 19

  • UNIT 3 AND 4 LECTURE Assessment ESSAY

UNIT 5

READ TB: The Long Twentieth Century, 1900–presentThe Long Twentieth Century: A New Period in World History?

  • Ch 20 MILESTONES OF THE PAST CENTURY: WAR AND REVOLUTION, 1900–1950

VIEW : Weekly Narrated Lectures: 8.1-8.4

COMPLETE:

  • MC CH 20

  • Lecture Questions UNIT 5 ID/Short Answer

GRADING PERIOD 3 ( DUE DATE 08/09/19 @ 11:59 PM)

UNIT 6

READ TB

  • Ch 21 MILESTONES OF THE PAST CENTURY: A CHANGING GLOBAL LANDSCAPE, 1950–PRESENT

  • Ch 22 GLOBAL PROCESSES: TECHNOLOGY, ECONOMY, AND SOCIETY, 1900–PRESENT

VIEW : Narrated MINI-Lectures 9.1-10.4

COMPLETE: A Woman in Berlin assignment or A Long Way Gone assignment

  • MC CH 21 + 22

  • Lecture questions UNIT 6 ID/Short Answer

UNIT 7

READ TB:

  • ch 23 GLOBAL PROCESSES: DEMOGRAPHY, CULTURE, AND THE ENVIRONMENT, 1900–PRESENT

VIEW : Narrated MINI-Lectures 11.1-11.2

COMPLETE:

  • MC CH 23

  • UNIT 6 and 7 Lecture Assessment ESSAY

UNIT 8

COMPLETE:

  • ALL outstanding late assignments if applicable

  • Final project