Palomar College Learning For Success

Economics, History, and Political Science

Where You Learn "How the World Works"

Economics Course Offerings

ECON 100 Basic Economics (3)
3 hours lecture
Note: Not intended for programs which require Principles of Economics ECON 101 and/or 102
Transfer acceptability: CSU; UC – no credit if taken after ECON 101 or 102
A study of the American economic system as it affects the decision making of the individual as income earner, taxpayer, and voter. Emphasis is on application of the analyses of supply and demand, productivity, wages and the labor force, the money and banking system, the role of government, and domestic and international economic issues.

ECON 101 Principles of Economics (Macro) (3)
3 hours lecture
Prerequisite: A minimum grade of ‘C’ in MATH 56, or MATH 60, or eligibility determined
through the math placement process.
Transfer acceptability: CSU; UC
C-ID ECON 202
Descriptive analysis of the structure and functioning of the economy of the United States. Emphasizes national income, problems of inflation and unemployment, the role of government, specifically fiscal and monetary policies, money and banking, economic growth, and analysis of global issues.

ECON 102 Principles of Economics (Micro) (3)
3 hours lecture
Prerequisite: A minimum grade of ‘C’ in MATH 56, or MATH 60, or eligibility determined through the math placement process.
Transfer acceptability: CSU; UC
C-ID ECON 201
Analyzes decision-making of individuals and groups as it relates to economic behavior. Examines market structures and resource markets under varying degrees of competition. Investigates causes of market failures such as public goods and externalities. Includes international trade and finance.

ECON 110 Comparative Economic Systems (3)
3 hours lecture
Transfer acceptability: CSU; UC
A study of various types of economic institutions and decision making systems.  Emphasis is given to the theories of capitalism, Marxian economics, and the various types of social market economies. The theories will be applied to the study of several countries, including the former Soviet Union, Japan, China, Mexico, and a Western European country, as they compare to the United States.

ECON 115 Economic History of the United States (3)
3 hours lecture
Transfer acceptability: CSU; UC
Development of the United States economy from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis will be on the evolution of such institutions as labor unions, business, banking, and government. Economic theory will be used to analyze historical problems.

ECON 120 Environmental Economics (3)
3 hours lecture
Transfer acceptability: CSU; UC
A study of major environmental issues from an economics perspective. Models will be developed and used to explore case studies on issues and policies. A strong emphasis will be placed on resource management problems. Course will provide a rationale for government involvement in the market-based economy.

ECON 125 Introduction to Labor Studies (3)
3 hours lecture
Transfer acceptability: CSU; UC
An introduction to Labor Studies. The focus is on how fundamental work is to human relations and the creation of communities. Moreover, the course examines how work, workers and organizations and institutions shape and define the employment relationship. Surveys how class, race, ethnicity, and gender impact work; the role of corporations; the role of unions; the global economy, and the future of work.

ECON 197 Economics Topics (.5 – 4)
Units awarded in topics courses are dependent upon the number of hours required of the student. Any combination of lecture and/or laboratory may be scheduled by the department. Refer to Class Schedule.
Transfer acceptability: CSU; UC – Credit determined by UC upon review of course syllabus.
Topics in Economics. See Class Schedule for specific topic offered. Course title will designate subject covered.

ECON 295 Directed Study in Economics (1, 2, 3)
1, 2, or 3 hours lecture
Transfer acceptability: CSU; UC – Credit determined by UC upon review of course syllabus.
Independent study for students who have demonstrated a proficiency in economics subjects and have the initiative to work independently on projects or research that does not fit into the context of regularly scheduled classes.
Students will work under the personal supervision of an instructor.