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Palomar College Learning For Success

Instructional Funding Sources

IELM Block Grant

Physical Plant and Instructional Support Guidelines FY 2017-18 (Block Grant or IELM) funds (refer to pages 35-37).  This funding is for Instructional Equipment, Library Materials, and technology.  Non-instructional (administrative) equipment and supplies are not allowed.

Below are the project grant numbers associated with this funding along with the state expenditure deadlines:

N/A FY 2018-2019 Instructional Equipment/Library Materials No Allocation
N/A FY 2019-2020 Instructional Equipment/Library Materials No Allocation
Project ID: FY 2020-2021 Instructional Equipment/Library Materials Must be encumbered by June 30, 2023

Lottery

The following are examples of approved instructional expenditures:

  • BlackBoard
  • Sinoco World Languages
  • Subscription of wire service to use by students
  • Maintenance of instructional software
  • Textbooks for use by students
  • Video and audio materials
  • Software licensing expenditures

The following District purchases have been disallowed in previous audits and were considered more “administrative” than instructional:

  • CurricUNET
  • Repair and maintenance of a radio transmitter for a radio program (publicly licensed/student-operated station)
  • Digitizing student newspapers to use as a research archive and reference database for the journalism program
  • Marketing materials
  • Laptops

Restricted Lottery expenses must have supporting documentation to show the payment for the activity is supported by the curriculum or the instructional experience.  If the instructor lists materials as part of the instructional experience in the syllabus, it could be justifiable. The District can also record educational software purchases to Object 6400 if the cost is over $200.00.

The following terms have the following meanings unless the context in which they appear clearly requires otherwise:

  1. “Basic instructional materials” means instructional materials that are designed for use by pupils as a principal learning resource and that meet in organization and content the basic requirements of the intended course.
  2. “Commission” means the Instructional Quality Commission.
  3. “Curriculum framework” means an outline of the components of a given course of study designed to provide state direction to school districts in the provision of instructional programs.
  4. “District board” means the board of education or governing board of a county, city and county, city, or another district that has the duty to provide for the education of the children in its county, city and county, city, or district.
  5. “Elementary school” means all public schools in which instruction is given through grade 8 or in any one or more of those grades.
  6. “Governing boards” means the state board and any one or more district boards.
  7. “High school” means all public schools other than elementary schools in which instruction is given through grade 12, or in any one or more of those grades.
  8. “Instructional materials” means all materials that are designed for use by pupils and their teachers as a learning resource and help pupils to acquire facts, skills, or opinions or to develop cognitive processes.  Instructional materials may be printed or nonprinted and may include textbooks, technology-based materials, other educational materials, and tests.
  9. “Nonpublic school” means a school that both satisfies the requirements of Section 48222, and is exempt from taxation under Section 214 of the Revenue and Taxation Code .
  10. “School official” means a member of a governing board, a city, county, city and county, or district superintendent of schools, and a principal, teacher, or another employee under his or her charge.
  11. “State board” means the State Board of Education.
  12. “Supplementary instructional materials” means instructional materials designed to serve, but not be limited to, one or more of the following purposes, for a given subject, at a given grade level:
    1. To provide more complete coverage of a subject or subjects included in a given course.
    2. To provide for meeting the various learning ability levels of pupils in a given age group or grade level.
    3. To provide for meeting the diverse educational needs of pupils with a language disability in a given age group or grade level.
    4. To provide for meeting the diverse educational needs of pupils reflective of a condition of cultural pluralism.
    5. To use current, relevant technology that further engages interactive learning in the classroom and beyond.
  13. “Technology-based materials” means basic or supplemental instructional materials that are designed for use by pupils and teachers as learning resources and that require the availability of electronic equipment in order to be used as a learning resource.
    1. Technology-based materials include, but are not limited to, software programs, video disks, compact disks, optical disks, video and audiotapes, lesson plans, and databases.
    2. Technology-based materials do not include the electronic equipment required to make use of those materials unless that equipment is to be used by pupils and teachers as a learning resource.  However, this shall not be construed to authorize a school district to replace computers or related equipment in an existing computer lab or allow a school district to establish a new computer lab.

Perkins

  • Perkin’s funds are to be used for program improvement of vocational programs. The funds cannot supplant.
  • Incorporates secondary education and postsecondary education elements;
  • Includes coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant career and technical content in a coordinated, non-duplicative progression of courses that align secondary to postsecondary education;
  • May include an opportunity for secondary education students to gain post-secondary education credits through dual or concurrent enrollment programs or other means; and
  • Leads to an industry-recognized credential or certificate at the postsecondary level or an associate or baccalaureate degree.
  • Has a data component
  • A few things we cannot purchase with Perkins funding: awards and memorabilia, contributions and donations, general advertising, maintenance, supplies and repairs.
  • Generally, we are making these decisions in February-March.

Strong Workforce

  • SWP funds are to be used for MORE AND BETTER CTE. The funds cannot supplant.
  • SWP funds are less restrictive than Perkins funding.
  • SWP funding criteria are grouped into seven areas targeting student success, career pathways, workforce data and outcomes, curriculum, CTE faculty, regional coordination and funding.
  • Focuses on data-driven outcomes rather than activities.
  • We have to look at supply and demand to fund a program. Cannot fund a program with an oversupply of certificates/degrees.
  • We have in the past had set-asides for curriculum development, marketing and professional development.
  • Generally, we are making these decisions in December-February.

Shayla Sivert
Acting Assistant Superintendent/Vice President of Instruction

Headshot of Acting VPI Shayla Sivert

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