What is Title IX?

Title IX is a comprehensive federal law enacted in 1972 that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any federally funded education program or activity. The principal objective of Title IX is to avoid the use of federal money to support sex discrimination in education programs and to provide individual citizens effective protection against those practices. Title IX applies to colleges and universities that receive Federal financial assistance.  Title IX states that:

“No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

Examples of the types of conduct that violates Title IX include, but are not limited to:

  • Dating or domestic violence
  • Pressure for sexual activity
  • Sexual innuendos and comments
  • Sexually explicit questions
  • Requests for sexual favors
  • Unwelcome touching, hugging, stroking, squeezing
  • Spreading rumors about a person’s sexuality
  • Sexual ridicule
  • Displaying or sending sexually suggestive electronic content, including but not limited to emails, text messages, etc.
  • Pervasive displays of pictures, calendars, cartoons, or other materials with sexually explicit or graphic content
  • Stalking a person
  • Attempted or actual sexual violence